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Bread Recipes

White Bread Sandwich Loaf (2 Loaves)

(This recipe may also be used to make dinner rolls. Just divide up your dough into smaller portions, approximately 16 rolls, and place them in a 9" x 13" baking pan, or one of slightly larger dimensions.)

10 cups all purpose white flour *

2 pkgs. active dry yeast (or 2 tablespoons)

¼ cup sugar

1 tablespoon salt

3 ½ cups warm water* (105º to 115º F.)

3 tablespoons Crisco® shortening

Combine dry ingredients with a wire wisk in a large mixing bowl. Heat water to 105º to 115º Fahrenheit, using an "instant read" thermometer to read the temperature. Do not heat water over 115º or you will kill your yeast.

Measure 3 tablespoons of Crisco® shortening using a tablespoon measure, scraping it level with the back of a knife to get an accurate measure.

Using a wooden spoon, begin stirring in warm water and shortening into the dry ingredients. When flour turns to clumps in mixing bowl, scrape off any of the mix left on the wooden spoon into the bowl and begin kneading the dough with your hands. (Make sure your hands, and under your fingernails, are clean before you start this whole process.)

Knead the dough 10 minutes until all the flour leaves the sides of the mixing bowl and is incorporated into the dough ball. After kneading for 10 minutes, cover the dough with a clean towel and allow the dough to rest.

The French bakers call this "break" Autolyse. It allows for several things to happen:

If you’ve ever seen me knead dough, you will know what I mean by giving the dough a "breather" because I tend to be pretty rough on my dough. I use the "slam and punch" method, which tends to frighten others to think I’m taking out my frustrations on the dough. While I am not, usually, perturbed while baking, I can see the benefits of using the dough as the object of one’s frustrations rather than their neighbor, but such is not the case. I really do enjoy making bread; from the whole process of kneading to eating the bread.

After allowing the dough to rest for 15 minutes, go back to it and knead it by hand (or machine, whichever way you prefer) for another 10 minutes. I can’t say enough about getting your hands onto (and into) the dough. Having as much contact as possible with your dough gives you a sense and "feel" of the dough, and you have a much more personal relationship to the bread in its whole process. It is, by the way, a living "thing" as yeast is basically a "friendly bacteria" and very much alive, therefore giving somewhat a "living" quality to the mass of dough you’re working on.

While you’re kneading the dough for the second 10 minutes, you’ll notice that the dough has become a little more "wet" or moist, and perhaps "sticky" and blistery. Don’t worry about it; there’s nothing wrong with your dough. It’s just done what it is supposed to do in absorbing the maximum amount of moisture from your water and shortening mix. If you find it sticking too much to your hands, get about a half cup of flour and sprinkle it around on the sides of your dough and coat your hands with the flour until the dough "firms" up.

After kneading the dough, place it in a lightly greased bowl, flip it to coat both sides, then cover it with plastic wrap over the bowl, and place a towel over the plastic. Set the dough to rise in a draft free environment (approximately 70º to 75º F.) Ideally, your temperature should be about 70º to 75º F. in temperature, but if not, you can place the dough to rise in an unlit oven. The heat from the pilot light should be sufficient to allow the dough to rise.

Allow the dough to rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in bulk. If you need to set a timer or carry a timer with you to remind you to go back and check on your dough, then do so, because rising dough waits for nobody.

After your dough has risen properly, punch it down, and turn it out on a lightly floured work surface. (A wooden cutting board or wooden chef table is the preferred surface to work on when baking and forming loaves. Make sure your work surface is clean to prevent contaminating your dough. One cannot stress cleanliness enough when it comes to baking bread, because contaminated dough can sometimes be very unforgiving.)

Brush the inside of 2 loaf pans with shortening and divide your dough into 2 equal portions. Form each loaf by rolling it out to a rectangle approximately 9" x 12", and roll it up on the short (narrow) side of the rectangle. Fold over the ends, and place the seam of the roll on the bottom as you lay it into the loaf pan. This "rolling" process is what gives your bread the smooth consistency that you want in a sandwich loaf.

Place the loaves in a draft free environment and allow to rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in the loaf pan. (Your loaf should have about a 2" to 4" crown above the rim of the loaf pan.)

Pre-heat your oven to 350º and spritz the oven with a spray bottle of water before placing the loaves in the oven. About 4 or 5 good sprays with your water bottle should be sufficient to build some steam in your oven. After spritzing the oven, close the door to the oven for 30 seconds, and then open the door again and spritz the oven again with another 4 or 5 sprays of water. Then place the loaves on a rack approximately in the center of the oven, taking care to keep them from touching one another and leave ample space around the perimeter walls of the oven.

Spritz the oven again and close the oven door. In the next five minutes, spritz the oven three more times then don’t spritz it no more. Make sure not to get any water on your loaves; you only want to spritz the bottom of the oven to create steam. This allows for keeping the crust soft enough in the first few minutes of baking to give the bread its final "spring." The last 30% of rising occurs in the initial minutes of baking just before the high heat of the oven kills off the yeast and a crust forms on your bread.

Bake the loaves for a total of 35 to 40 minutes, or until golden brown on the crust. Thumping the crust should sound hollow.

Voilá! You can now remove the loaves and place them on a wire rack to cool, or go for the temptation of slicing into the hot loaf and slathering it with butter. Or just bite into the bread without anything on it. Enjoy!

White Bread Sandwich Loaf (2 Loaves) – Short version

(This recipe may also be used to make dinner rolls. Just divide up your dough into smaller portions, approximately 16 rolls, and place them in a 9" x 13" baking pan, or one of slightly larger dimensions.)

10 cups all purpose white flour *

2 pkgs. active dry yeast (or 2 tablespoons)

¼ cup sugar

1 tablespoon salt

3 ½ cups warm water* (105º to 115º F.)

3 tablespoons Crisco® shortening

Combine dry ingredients with a wire wisk in a large mixing bowl. Heat water to 105º to 115º Fahrenheit, using an "instant read" thermometer to read the temperature. Do not heat water over 115º or you will kill your yeast.

Measure 3 tablespoons of Crisco® shortening using a tablespoon measure, scraping it level with the back of a knife to get an accurate measure.

Using a wooden spoon, begin stirring in warm water and shortening into the dry ingredients. When flour turns to clumps in mixing bowl, scrape off any of the mix left on the wooden spoon into the bowl and begin kneading the dough with your hands.

Knead the dough 10 minutes until all the flour leaves the sides of the mixing bowl and is incorporated into the dough ball. After kneading for 10 minutes, cover the dough with a clean towel and allow the dough to rest.

After allowing the dough to rest for 15 minutes, go back to it and knead it by hand (or machine, whichever way you prefer) for another 10 minutes. While you’re kneading the dough for the second 10 minutes, you’ll notice that the dough has become a little more "wet" or moist, and perhaps "sticky" and blistery. Don’t worry about it; there’s nothing wrong with your dough. It’s just doing what it is supposed to do by absorbing the maximum amount of moisture from your water and shortening mix. If you find it sticking too much to your hands, get about a half cup of flour and sprinkle it around on the sides of your dough and coat your hands with the flour and continue kneading it until the dough "firms" up.

After kneading the dough, place it in a lightly greased bowl, flip it to coat both sides, then cover it with plastic wrap over the bowl, and place a towel over the plastic. Set the dough to rise in a draft free environment (approximately 70º to 75º F.) Ideally, your temperature should be about 70º to 75º F. in temperature, but if not, you can place the dough to rise in an unlit oven. The heat from the pilot light should be sufficient to allow the dough to rise.

Allow the dough to rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in bulk. After your dough has risen properly, punch it down, and turn it out on a lightly floured work surface.

Brush the inside of 2 loaf pans with shortening and divide your dough into 2 equal portions. Form each loaf by rolling it out to a rectangle approximately 9" x 12", and roll it up on the short (narrow) side of the rectangle. Fold over the ends, and place the seam of the roll on the bottom as you lay it into the loaf pan. This "rolling" process is what gives your bread the smooth consistency that you want in a sandwich loaf.

Place the loaves in a draft free environment and allow to rise for another 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in the loaf pan. (Your loaf should have about a 2" to 4" crown above the rim of the loaf pan.)

Pre-heat your oven to 350º and spritz the oven with a spray bottle of water before placing the loaves in the oven. About 4 or 5 good sprays with your water bottle should be sufficient to build some steam in your oven. After spritzing the oven, close the door to the oven for 30 seconds, and then open the door again and spritz the oven again with another 4 or 5 sprays of water. Then place the loaves on a rack approximately in the center of the oven, taking care to keep them from touching one another and leave ample space around the perimeter walls of the oven.

Spritz the oven again and close the oven door. In the next five minutes, spritz the oven three more times then don’t spritz it any more. Make sure not to get any water on your loaves; you only want to spritz the bottom of the oven to create steam. This allows for keeping the crust soft enough in the first few minutes of baking to give the bread its final "spring." The last 30% of rising occurs in the initial minutes of baking just before the high heat of the oven kills off the yeast and a crust forms on your bread.

Bake the loaves for a total of 35 to 40 minutes, or until golden brown on the crust. Thumping the crust should sound hollow. When the loaves are finished baking remove the loaves and place them on a wire rack to cool, or go for the temptation of slicing into the hot loaf and slathering it with butter. Or just bite into the bread without anything on it. Enjoy!

Light Wheat Bread Sandwich Loaf (2 Loaves)

(This recipe may also be used to make dinner rolls. Just divide up your dough into smaller portions, approximately 16 rolls, and place them in a 9" x 13" baking pan, or one of slightly larger dimensions.)

8 cups all purpose white flour *

2 cups whole wheat flour

2 pkgs. active dry yeast (or 2 tablespoons)

¼ cup sugar

1 tablespoon salt

3 ½ cups warm water* (105º to 115º F.)

3 tablespoons Crisco® shortening

Combine dry ingredients with a wire wisk in a large mixing bowl. Heat water to 105º to 115º Fahrenheit, using an "instant read" thermometer to read the temperature. Do not heat water over 115º or you will kill your yeast.

Measure 3 tablespoons of Crisco® shortening using a tablespoon measure, scraping it level with the back of a knife to get an accurate measure.

Using a wooden spoon, begin stirring in warm water and shortening into the dry ingredients. When flour turns to clumps in mixing bowl, scrape off any of the mix left on the wooden spoon into the bowl and begin kneading the dough with your hands.

Knead the dough 10 minutes until all the flour leaves the sides of the mixing bowl and is incorporated into the dough ball. After kneading for 10 minutes, cover the dough with a clean towel and allow the dough to rest.

After allowing the dough to rest for 15 minutes, go back to it and knead it by hand (or machine, whichever way you prefer) for another 10 minutes. While you’re kneading the dough for the second 10 minutes, you’ll notice that the dough has become a little more "wet" or moist, and perhaps "sticky" and blistery. Don’t worry about it; there’s nothing wrong with your dough. It’s just doing what it is supposed to do by absorbing the maximum amount of moisture from your water and shortening mix. If you find it sticking too much to your hands, get about a half cup of flour and sprinkle it around on the sides of your dough and coat your hands with the flour and continue kneading it until the dough "firms" up.

After kneading the dough, place it in a lightly greased bowl, flip it to coat both sides, then cover it with plastic wrap over the bowl, and place a towel over the plastic. Set the dough to rise in a draft free environment (approximately 70º to 75º F.) Ideally, your temperature should be about 70º to 75º F. in temperature, but if not, you can place the dough to rise in an unlit oven. The heat from the pilot light should be sufficient to allow the dough to rise.

Allow the dough to rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in bulk. After your dough has risen properly, punch it down, and turn it out on a lightly floured work surface.

Brush the inside of 2 loaf pans with shortening and divide your dough into 2 equal portions. Form each loaf by rolling it out to a rectangle approximately 9" x 12", and roll it up on the short (narrow) side of the rectangle. Fold over the ends, and place the seam of the roll on the bottom as you lay it into the loaf pan. This "rolling" process is what gives your bread the smooth consistency that you want in a sandwich loaf.

Place the loaves in a draft free environment and allow to rise for another 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in the loaf pan. (Your loaf should have about a 2" to 4" crown above the rim of the loaf pan.)

You may also choose to roll out both portions into a round loaf (boule) and place them at opposite corners of a baking sheet sprinkled with corn meal.

Pre-heat your oven to 350º and spritz the oven with a spray bottle of water before placing the loaves in the oven. About 4 or 5 good sprays with your water bottle should be sufficient to build some steam in your oven. After spritzing the oven, close the door to the oven for 30 seconds, and then open the door again and spritz the oven again with another 4 or 5 sprays of water. Then place the loaves on a rack approximately in the center of the oven, taking care to keep them from touching one another and leave ample space around the perimeter walls of the oven.

Spritz the oven again and close the oven door. In the next five minutes, spritz the oven three more times then don’t spritz it any more. Make sure not to get any water on your loaves; you only want to spritz the bottom of the oven to create steam. This allows for keeping the crust soft enough in the first few minutes of baking to give the bread its final "spring." The last 30% of rising occurs in the initial minutes of baking just before the high heat of the oven kills off the yeast and a crust forms on your bread.

Bake the loaves for a total of 35 to 40 minutes, or until golden brown on the crust. Thumping the crust should sound hollow. When the loaves are finished baking remove the loaves and place them on a wire rack to cool.

Light Rye Bread Sandwich Loaf (2 Loaves)

(This recipe may also be used to make dinner rolls. Just divide up your dough into smaller portions, approximately 16 rolls, and place them in a 9" x 13" baking pan, or one of slightly larger dimensions.)

8 cups all purpose white flour *

2 cups rye flour

2 tablespoons whole caraway seed

2 pkgs. active dry yeast (or 2 tablespoons)

¼ cup sugar

1 tablespoon salt

3 ½ cups warm water* (105º to 115º F.)

3 tablespoons Crisco® shortening

Combine dry ingredients with a wire wisk in a large mixing bowl. Heat water to 105º to 115º Fahrenheit, using an "instant read" thermometer to read the temperature. Do not heat water over 115º or you will kill your yeast.

Measure 3 tablespoons of Crisco® shortening using a tablespoon measure, scraping it level with the back of a knife to get an accurate measure.

Using a wooden spoon, begin stirring in warm water and shortening into the dry ingredients. When flour turns to clumps in mixing bowl, scrape off any of the mix left on the wooden spoon into the bowl and begin kneading the dough with your hands.

Knead the dough 10 minutes until all the flour leaves the sides of the mixing bowl and is incorporated into the dough ball. After kneading for 10 minutes, cover the dough with a clean towel and allow the dough to rest.

After allowing the dough to rest for 15 minutes, go back to it and knead it by hand (or machine, whichever way you prefer) for another 10 minutes. While you’re kneading the dough for the second 10 minutes, you’ll notice that the dough has become a little more "wet" or moist, and perhaps "sticky" and blistery. Don’t worry about it; there’s nothing wrong with your dough. It’s just doing what it is supposed to do by absorbing the maximum amount of moisture from your water and shortening mix. If you find it sticking too much to your hands, get about a half cup of flour and sprinkle it around on the sides of your dough and coat your hands with the flour and continue kneading it until the dough "firms" up.

After kneading the dough, place it in a lightly greased bowl, flip it to coat both sides, then cover it with plastic wrap over the bowl, and place a towel over the plastic. Set the dough to rise in a draft free environment (approximately 70º to 75º F.) Ideally, your temperature should be about 70º to 75º F. in temperature, but if not, you can place the dough to rise in an unlit oven. The heat from the pilot light should be sufficient to allow the dough to rise.

Allow the dough to rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in bulk. After your dough has risen properly, punch it down, and turn it out on a lightly floured work surface.

Brush the inside of 2 loaf pans with shortening and divide your dough into 2 equal portions. Form each loaf by rolling it out to a rectangle approximately 9" x 12", and roll it up on the short (narrow) side of the rectangle. Fold over the ends, and place the seam of the roll on the bottom as you lay it into the loaf pan. This "rolling" process is what gives your bread the smooth consistency that you want in a sandwich loaf.

Place the loaves in a draft free environment and allow to rise for another 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in the loaf pan. (Your loaf should have about a 2" to 4" crown above the rim of the loaf pan.)

You may also choose to roll out both portions into a round loaf (boule) and place them at opposite corners of a baking sheet sprinkled with corn meal.

Pre-heat your oven to 350º and spritz the oven with a spray bottle of water before placing the loaves in the oven. About 4 or 5 good sprays with your water bottle should be sufficient to build some steam in your oven. After spritzing the oven, close the door to the oven for 30 seconds, and then open the door again and spritz the oven again with another 4 or 5 sprays of water. Then place the loaves on a rack approximately in the center of the oven, taking care to keep them from touching one another and leave ample space around the perimeter walls of the oven.

Spritz the oven again and close the oven door. In the next five minutes, spritz the oven three more times then don’t spritz it any more. Make sure not to get any water on your loaves; you only want to spritz the bottom of the oven to create steam. This allows for keeping the crust soft enough in the first few minutes of baking to give the bread its final "spring." The last 30% of rising occurs in the initial minutes of baking just before the high heat of the oven kills off the yeast and a crust forms on your bread.

Bake the loaves for a total of 35 to 40 minutes, or until golden brown on the crust. Thumping the crust should sound hollow. When the loaves are finished baking remove the loaves and place them on a wire rack to cool.

Sourdough Bread Recipes

Sourdough Starter (3 day starter)

1 package active dry yeast (or 1 tablespoon) = ¼ oz.

2 cups lukewarm water (85º to 100º F.)

1 tablespoon sugar

1 ½ cups unbleached all purpose flour

½ cup mashed potatoes (cooled to room temperature)

½ cup yellow cornmeal

Dissolve 1 tablespoon sugar in lukewarm water and sprinkle yeast on top of water and allow yeast to dissolve into the water, then gently stir it with a fork until blended. Gently mix in flour, cornmeal, and mashed potatoes, taking care to mix out all the lumps. Pour mixture into a large glass jar or an earthenware crock deep enough to allow the batter to rise. Cover well or seal with a lid and set in a warm place, approximately 75º F. in temperature, to ferment. Allow mixture to ferment for 48 to 72 hours, then add a mixture of 1 cup flour and 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon of sugar. Allow to sit overnight, or 24 hours, before using.

The culture will separate and appear like clabbered milk, but don’t let that alarm you; it’s just doing what comes natural: just stir it down with a clean wooden spoon and let it repeat the process.

At the end of the third day your starter should have a pleasantly sour (but not rancid) aroma. It should smell "yeasty" and slightly like beer. It can be kept refrigerated once it is properly fermented and can even be frozen. If frozen, allow to thaw completely at room temperature for at least 24 hours in approximately 75º F. and return to a slurry. Stir it down and replenish it with another feeding of a mixture of 1 cup flour and 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon of sugar. Allow to sit overnight, or 24 hours, before using.

Each time you use an amount of your starter, replenish it with a feeding of equal amounts of flour and water as you took out for your recipe. Most often you will only need 1 cup flour and 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon of sugar each time. Otherwise, adjust your feedings to fit your baking needs.

You may also keep up the daily feeding schedule by feeding your starter two or three times a day for several days, until you build up the amount of your starter to approximately one gallon.

Sourdough Bread (2 Loaves)

(Start one day ahead of schedule)

(This recipe may also be used to make dinner rolls. Just divide up your dough into smaller portions, approximately 16 rolls, and place them in a 9" x 13" baking pan, or one of slightly larger dimensions.)

12 cups all purpose unbleached flour

2 tablespoons active dry yeast (or 2 packages)

¼ cup sugar

1 tablespoon sugar

3 ½ cups warm water* (105º to 115º F.)

4 tablespoons shortening

1 cup sourdough starter

Combine dry ingredients with a wire wisk in a large mixing bowl. Heat water to 105º to 115º F. using an "instant read" meat thermometer to read temperature. Do not overheat your water over 115º F. or you will kill your yeast. (To cool down overheated water, stir in 1 ice cube at a time until water temperature lowers to 115º F.) Keep count of how many ice cubes you use and draw off an equal number of tablespoons of water, or your dough will be too moist. (If you forget to draw off the extra water, it’s not a disaster… you can always add about a ½ cup of extra flour during the kneading process to "firm up" your dough.)

Measure out 4 tablespoons of shortening using a tablespoon measure, scraping it level with the back of a knife. Using a wooden spoon, begin stirring in the warm water, shortening and sourdough starter into the dry ingredients. When the dough begins to clump in the mixing bowl, scrape off any mix from the wooden spoon and begin kneading the dough by hand.

Knead the dough for 10 minutes then cover the dough with a clean towel to allow the dough to rest for 15 minutes. (Autolyse*) After the "resting" is finished, knead the dough for 10 more minutes then place in a lightly greased bowl. Flip it to coat both sides of the dough, then cover the bowl with plastic wrap and a lid or towel. Set the bowl of dough into the refrigerator for 24 hours to retard rising and allow the sourdough to ferment the dough.

At the end of 24 hours, take the dough out and punch it down and form it into loaves or dinner roll portions, and allow to rise again for 1 to 1 ½ hours, or until doubled in bulk. (Depending on temperature, and climatic conditions, this second rising may take up to three hours. Not to worry! Your bread will only taste better!)

Pre-heat your oven to 350º and spritz the oven with a spray bottle of water before placing the loaves in the oven. About 4 or 5 good sprays with your water bottle should be sufficient to build some steam in your oven. After spritzing the oven, close the door to the oven for 30 seconds, and then open the door again and spritz the oven again with another 4 or 5 sprays of water. Then place the loaves on a rack approximately in the center of the oven, taking care to keep them from touching one another and leave ample space around the perimeter walls of the oven.

Spritz the oven again and close the oven door. In the next five minutes, spritz the oven three more times then don’t spritz it any more. Make sure not to get any water on your loaves; you only want to spritz the bottom of the oven to create steam. This allows for keeping the crust soft enough in the first few minutes of baking to give the bread its final "spring." The last 30% of rising occurs in the initial minutes of baking just before the high heat of the oven kills off the yeast and a crust forms on your bread.

Bake the loaves for a total of 35 to 40 minutes, or until golden brown on the crust. Thumping the crust should sound hollow. When the loaves are finished baking remove the loaves and place them on a wire rack to cool.

Old Fashioned Hill Country White Bread (1 loaf)

Shelba Riedel

Blanco, Texas

3 ½ cups all purpose unbleached white flour

1 teaspoon salt

3 tablespoons sugar

1 cup warm water (105º to 115º F.)

1 large egg*

2 tablespoons shortening

Combine dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Whip egg with a wire wisk until blended, but not frothing or foaming. Combine egg with water and shortening mix slowly into flour. Mix well until flour leaves the sides of mixing bowl. Knead dough for approximately 10 minutes then cover the dough in the bowl and allow it to rest for 15 minutes. After resting, knead for 10 more minutes. Turn dough out into a lightly greased bowl and cover bowl with plastic wrap and a clean towel and allow to rise at room temperature (approximately 75º F.) for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in bulk. Punch down dough and form into a loaf and place into a lightly greased loaf pan, cover and allow to rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled. (The loaf should have a 2" to 4" crown above the rim of the loaf pan.) Bake in preheated oven at 350º F. for 35 to 40 minutes, or until golden brown on the crust. Thumping the loaf should produce a hollow sound when the loaf is done, or you may also insert an "instant read" thermometer into the center of your loaf through the bottom of your crust and get an internal temperature of at least 200º F. Remove loaf from oven and set out on a wire rack to cool.

(To make a sourdough version of this bread, add ½ cup flour and ½ cup sourdough starter to your ingredient list. After mixing ingredients and kneading, allow the dough to rise in the refrigerator for 24 hours then proceed with the rest of the instructions as outlined above.)

Flat Bread or Pizza Crust (4 medium breads or crusts)

Shelba Riedel

Blanco, Texas

12 cups all purpose unbleached flour

4 tablespoons yeast

4 tablespoons sugar

6 teaspoons salt

1 ½ tablespoons basil (may also add or substitute with mexican oregano)

1 ½ tablespoons garlic (fresh, crushed or minced garlic is best)

4 tablespoons parmesan cheese

5 cups warm water (105º to 115º F.)

4 tablespoons olive oil

Mix (combine) dry ingredients in large mixing bowl. Heat water to 105º to 115º F. using an instant read thermometer. Add olive oil to water and mix into flour and knead until all the flour is off the sides of the bowl (approximately 10 minutes). Autolyse for 15 minutes. Knead for 10 more minutes and form into a ball and place into a lightly greased bowl. Flip the boule to grease both sides, cover with plastic wrap and a towel and allow to rise at room temperatures (approximately 75º to 85º F.) for 1 hour, or until doubled in bulk. Punch down slightly and roll into boule, and divide into 4 equal parts. Pat down each portion with your hands to form a pizza round approximately 10" in diameter. Brush pizza forms with olive oil or shortening and sprinkle with your favorite herbs and kosher salt. Spray or drizzle with olive oil. Allow to rise 1 hour or until doubled in thickness. Dimple the bread with your fingers and bake in a pre-heated oven at 450º F. for 20 minutes. After baking, you may add your favorite toppings and cheeses, and put back into the oven for 7 to 10 minutes to cook ingredients.

For sourdough version, replace 1 cup of flour with 1 cup of sourdough starter. Allow to rise and ferment in refrigerator for 7 or 8 hours (no more than 12), then bake according to directions above.